Nursing Students Could Be Getting Up To $5,000 In Relief Funds

Nursing Students Could Be Getting Up To $5,000 In Relief Funds 

Billions of dollars in stimulus set aside for America’s nursing students impacted by the coronavirus shutdown remains largely untapped.

As much as $7 billion was earmarked specifically for students as part of the $2 trillion relief package passed by Congress earlier this year, but as of late-April only 1% had actually been distributed, partially because students may have been unaware they were eligible.

A new online tool.

According to Frank CEO Charlie Javice, their new portal was immediately hit with unprecedented demand." to help remedy that issue, financial aid startup Frank recently teamed up with education giant Chegg to simplify the application process with a new online tool. According to Frank CEO Charlie Javice, their new portal was immediately hit with unprecedented demand.

Students could be eligible for anywhere from $500 to up to $5,000 of aid.”" In about 10 hours we got over 10,000 applications submitted,” she told us in an email.. 

Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund, (HEERF) have been changing since the program was launched. A judge recently blocked prior Department of Education guidance that attempted to limit eligibility to Title-IV students who were on financial aid.

Now, colleges have more leeway to distribute aid, and in some cases have been prioritizing students who had filed a FAFSA or federal student loan application though that is no longer necessary to receive aid.". 

The rules for distribution of the aid, referred to as the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund, (HEERF) have been changing since the program was launched.

Now, colleges have more leeway to distribute aid, and in some cases have been prioritizing students who had filed a FAFSA or federal student loan application though that is no longer necessary to receive aid.

“There are different eligibility requirements,” Javice said, adding that in order to maximize direct aid students may need to provide proof of either job loss or reduced hours or eligible expenses tied to food or travel that stemmed from coronavirus hardships.

Beyond that, much of the onus falls on colleges to inform students of the aid and distribute it to students in need — something colleges have failed in large part to do so far, Javice said.