Intensive In-Hospital Support Doubles Likelihood Of Smoking Cessation In Heart Patients


 
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SAN FRANCISCO (ASRN.ORG)- Patients admitted to hospital with coronary artery disease are twice as likely to quit smoking after receiving intensive smoking cessation support compared to minimal support, found a new study.

The study, a randomized clinical trial, compared intensive intervention with minimal intervention and found that patients admitted for open heart surgery (coronary artery bypass grafts) had significantly higher long-term abstinence rates at 1 year compared with those admitted for heart attacks (acute myocardial infarctions.)

Other factors that contributed to successful long-term smoking cessation included absence of a previous heart attack, postsecondary education and at least some smoking restrictions at home.

The intervention used in the study resulted in the highest rates of 1-year confirmed smoking cessation in previous tests in the US.

This study involved 45-60 minutes of bedside education and counseling sessions in hospital followed by 7 telephone counseling sessions with a nurse at specific intervals over 2 months. These calls helped patients to problem-solve by developing cognitive, behavioral and social support strategies for use when they found themselves in high-risk situations; in doing so the patients could maintain their smoke-free status.

"The rates of confirmed long-term abstinence rates observed in this trial are among the highest rates reported in cardiac populations and are among the highest reported absolute differences between minimal and intensive interventions," write Dr. Patricia Smith, Northern Ontario School of Medicine and Dr. Ellen Burgess, University of Calgary.

"Our results suggest that intensive counseling provided during the hospital stay is more effective than a stepped-care approach that provides intensive counseling only after a patient has relapsed," write the authors.

They suggest inpatient programs have the potential to significantly reduce cardiac events and hospital costs and should become standard practice in hospitals.

 

Copyright 2009- American Society of Registered Nurses (ASRN.ORG)-All Rights Reserved



 
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    Editor-in Chief:
    Kirsten Nicole

    Editorial Staff:
    Kirsten Nicole
    Stan Kenyon
    Robyn Bowman
    Kimberly McNabb
    Lisa Gordon
    Stephanie Robinson

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    Stan Kenyon
    Liz Di Bernardo
    Cris Lobato
    Elisa Howard
    Susan Cramer

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